World Read Aloud Day

WRAD

World Read Aloud Day is Wednesday Feb, 5, 2020! It’s a day to celebrate the joy of reading aloud. Literacy is a fundamental human right that belongs to everyone. The best part of reading out loud is that it is a shared reading experience, that not only increases the listener’s vocabulary and literary skills, but also can create a special bond between the reader and the listener. It’s powerful stuff! On February 5th, World Read Aloud Day, join millions of readers, writers, and listeners from communities across the world as we come together to honor the joy and power of reading and sharing stories. Let’s continue to expand the definition and scope of global literacy. Celebrate World Read Aloud Day by grabbing a book, and someone you love, and read out loud.

Read aloud tipspicture reading

Read It Ahead of Time Reading through that story ahead of time gives you a head’s up on the wording, the rhythm and the pronunciation of the story as well as any story surprises. Your read aloud is much more likely to be a winning performance for your listeners if you scan through it before you read it out loud.

Pause Before the Page Turn. Give your listeners lots of time to take in the illustrations before you flip to the next page.

Speak Up and Slow Down. Your listeners will take in more of the story if you give them time to process what you are saying. Use your stage voice and you are more likely to keep their attention.

Post Book Recap- Talk about the story after it is finished. Ask the listeners, who was in the story, where did it take place, what was the problem and how was the problem solved. No wrong answers here! Think of this as a mini book club conversation. Give your listeners the opportunity to share their thoughts on the story, and the read aloud story will have more of a lasting impact.

Re-Read Those Favourites- Picture books are intended to be read over and over again. Enjoy a favourite! This gives the listener an opportunity to ‘visit an old friend’ as well as discover something new in a familiar story.

Try Something New- Don’t be afraid to introduce your listeners to a new topic- even a heavy handed topic can be covered in a softer, gentler way through the pages of a picture book.Logos-1

 

Common Core- Meet Inquiry Based Story Time!

 

In a recent Open Book Blog entitled Compare and Contrast with the Common Core in Kindergarten, http://networkedblogs.com/TcvVz Jill Eisenberg compares the 8 page level A reader MEAT PIES by Celenia Chevere and Patricia M. Hubert (about a boy who makes Empanadas with his grandmother) with the 8 page level C reader TIME FOR TACOS by Carla Golembe  (about a boy who makes tacos with his dad.) Eisenberg describes how to dissect these two stories in order to meet the common core curriculum of comparing and contrasting.  Can I make another suggestion?

Story time is an excellent opportunity to compare and contrast text. There are tons of terrific picture books just begging to be used in a ‘compare and contrast’ manner!

Have you shared HOW COLD WAS IT? by Jan Barclay, yet?Image http://books.google.ca/books/about/How_Cold_Was_It.html?id=jy2XbiWp5cEC&redir_esc=y

 Imagine the fun of comparing the scenes with such extreme weather contrast, when you then share her story, HOW HOT WAS IT?  Imagehttp://www.amazon.ca/How-Hot-Was-Jane-Barclay/dp/1894222709

I guarantee you’ll not only cover your common core literacy comparison and contrast, these two picture books will spark conversation, exploration and inquiry into temperature that will cover many math and science strands as well.

I love to compare and contrast different versions of folk and fairy tales. I’ve started with the classic Little Golden Book, LITTLE RED HEN by Diane Mudrow,Image http://www.amazon.com/The-Little-Red-Golden-Book/dp/0307960307

and then introduced another version of the storyImage

http://www.amazon.ca/The-Little-Red-Paul-Galdone/dp/0899193498

The children love identifying the similarities and differences of each version.  And they become very excited when yet another version is discovered.Image

http://www.harpercollinschildrens.com/books/Little-Red-Hen-Byron-Barton/?isbn13=9780060216757&tctid=100

I’ve invited children to look through their fairy tale collections at home and bring in a version if they have one. We’ve charted the differences in the versions told (ie, sometimes the little red hen has chicks, sometimes she doesn’t. Sometimes her friends are a dog, cat and rat, sometimes they are a duck, pig and dog etc.) And with all this talk about bread- we just had to bake bread one day!  So not only are you covering your common core comparison and contrasting of the key ideas and details of each story, the structure, and the relationship between illustration and print in each story, you are adding the language, math and science exploration of reading the recipe and baking the bread.

And can you imagine the excitement when we found a version where the Little Red Hen and her friends live in a high-rise apartment in the middle of the city, and she’s making pizza!Image

 http://www.amazon.ca/The-Little-Red-Makes-Pizza/dp/0142301892

We were going to town, comparing the ingredients of these two items. (and the pizzas we ended up making were delicious!)

Introduce some felt pieces to your felt board, some puppets to your theatre, and suddenly children are telling (and eventually writing) their own creative version of the Little Red Hen.

 

If your children like the latest Jon Klassen story, THIS IS NOT MY HATImage

http://www.amazon.com/This-Is-Not-My-Hat/dp/0763655996

about a tiny fish who has swiped someone’s hat, they will have a blast comparing and contrasting that story with Klassen’s  original, I WANT MY HAT BACKImage

http://www.amazon.ca/I-Want-My-Hat-Back/dp/0763655988 which has the same visual dead-pan humor but is told through the eyes of the ‘victim’, as apposed to the ‘perpetrator’.

Part of our job, as educators, is to be greats story tellers. We need to guide children through stimulating conversation regarding the stories they hear. (Think of yourself as the leader of your very young book club.) When we invite children to make connections and identify comparisons in a picture book, we provide an opportunity for each child to make a deeper connection with the book. This does so much more than cover curriculum; this plants the seed for a lifelong love of reading.